52 Ancestors 52 Weeks

52ancestors

#11 (catch up) John Hominy Wright is my 4th great grandfather on my maternal grandmother’s side. He was born 17 March 1774 to James Wright and Sarah Haworth in Newberry, South Carolina. The family were among a group of Quakers who had moved to South Carolina and formed the Newberry Monthly Meeting. Later on John Hominy settled Randolph County, Indiana with his wife Margaret Lane Reese again with a group of Quakers. Our family has a long history of being Quakers.

I‘m not sure where he picked up the nickname, Hominy. It is said that wherever it was, there were so many John Wrights that they were all given nicknames to differentiate between them. If you read histories of Randolph County, Indiana, there were so many Wrights that it is hard to keep them apart in your mind.

 

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23 Apr – Martha Marie Wright Tennant – Five Year Diary

23 Apr

1942 Did Nothing all Day Just fooled around trying to clean. Marie worked today. Marie went To Dance at school.

1943 I washed Buds clothes He didn’t get His C. Book But got gas to get to Taft & left about 6 oclock I feel so Blue tonight.

1944 No entry

1945 No entry

1946 No entry

 

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52 Ancestors 52 Weeks

52ancestors

#16 Susannah Wright Hollingsworth was the daughter of John Wright and Rachel Wells, which would make her my fifth great grand aunt. She was born on 15 April 1755 in North Carolina. She married Isaac Hollingsworth on 12 December 1772 still in North Carolina. The Wright family were well known Quakers and Susannah is mentioned in at least three books that I know of.

Two of them talk about her preaching. An excerpt from  ‘A Walk In a Country Churchyard,’ by Luke Smith Mote, Autumn, 1880: “The next one (grave) over south is marked with the initials ‘S. H. 1830,’ which stands for Susanna Hollingsworth, the mother of Susanna Jones above, died at her son-in-law’s Robert Pearson three miles northwest of here on the thirty-first of July of that year. Her home then was with her daughter Sarah in Clinton Co., but was taken sick there whilst on a social visit to her children and (?)here away. She had lived a widow many years amongst her children. Her husband (I. Hollingsworth) died in 1809, who was also buried in this tier. She was a recorded minister of the gospel and one of the first older emigrants from Bush River, S.C. She had traveled considerable in different states in the service of the gospel, as the records show.” Then another one went into further detail. An excerpt from The Annals of Newberry – First Part by O’Neall, page 30: “…Susannah Hollingsworth, was not so highly gifted.  Henry O’Neall , and other young Friends, used to affirm, that when Aunt Suzey, as she was called began to pray, they could always keep ahead of her by repeating the words she was about to say.”

A third gives us a good picture of her. In ‘The Annals of Newberry – Part Second’, by John Chapman, page 342“ Before Isaac Hollingsworth’s family is dismissed I must give a short biography of his wife, my most revered maternal grandmother. Left a widow, as before stated, in 1809 at the age of 54, she lived among her children the remainder of her life. She made religious visits after her husband’s death, one of which was, I think, to Newberry, others to the East. Possessing an excellent memory and having long experience, she was an excellent conversationalist. With great interest have I heard her tell the fearful tales of the revolution in Newberry district; of how Foster, the desperate Tory and criminal, who, refusing to heed the warning her father had given, was shot through the head after peace was made. Her piety, equanimity and kindness, particularly towards her grandchildren, were such that they loved her with the most ardent affection, believing that no grandmother could be better. One Sunday evening in July, 1830 she went on horseback from her daughter’s residence to that of her son-in-law, his wife being dead. On the way she said to her company young grandson:’I am going to thy fathers just to die.’  This was said with as much calmness of feeling as though she had said I’m going there to live. The next day she was taken ill. To her son Joel who visited her she said ‘I am going, but not as speedily as I could wish.’  Death came to her as a friend. Near the close of the week she died and was buried on the following Sunday.” 

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22 Apr – Martha Marie Wright Tennant – Five Year Diary

22 Apr

1942 Dad went out this Morning & came home in eve with Toes all Mashed & Broke what luck Glad it wasnt worse.

1943 Dad worked M.T. & is asleep Bud Dug up a place for a garden He is going to Taft & I will sure Miss him so.

1944 No entry

1945 No entry

1946 No entry

 

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21 Apr – Martha Marie Wright Tennant – Five Year Diary

21 Apr

1942 Came up yesterday Today To S. Maria & got House at 508C S. Thornburg St. Not much but 35 per Month. O well. Marie can stay home.

1943 Bud fooled around all Day. Dad slept Till 4 Today. Lot of Noise too. I worked in yard weeds are so high all around here

1944 No entry

1945 No entry

1946 No entry

1942 entry: I checked Google Earth for the address. 508C S. Thornburg Street is still there in Santa Maria. It is a six bungalow court of three bungalows facing the other three bungalows. The court runs perpendicular to the street. It must have been two bedrooms if they felt that they could keep Marie at home with them. I wonder where she was living while they were out of town?

 

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20 Apr – Martha Marie Wright Tennant – Five Year Diary

20 Apr

1942 Got card from the Kids Both are O.K. Ray called To be in Santa Maria wednesday Morning to go to work.

1943 Boys worked M. Tour & its Buds last Tour I sure hate To see him go away we will Miss him so. He went To L. Beach Tonight

1944 No entry

1945 No entry

1946 No entry

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52 Ancestors 52 Weeks

52ancestors

#10 (catch up)  Minnie Bell Mills, my great grandmother on my mothers maternal side, was born 8 March 1873 in Farmland, Indiana. The Mills were some of the original settlers of the area back in the early part of that century, along with the Wrights, which were her husband’s family.

Minnie Bell was the eldest of ten children of Jacob Riley Mills and Mary A Roberson. She lived a fairly comfortable life for the area and the times. He father owned a large property which included Mills Lake. He stocked it with fish. People would travel from the nearby towns to picnic on the banks and fish. In the winter, he gathered ice and packed it away to sell during the warmer months. They would have worked hard but never gone hungry or without anything they really needed.

Then she met that darned Wright boy, Everett Emerson. LOL They married and had six children when he decided they should pull up stakes and move to Oklahoma. He had traveled there as a young man and always wanted to go back. The family story goes that he was “adopted” by a local indian chief while he was there. (Why is it that it is always a chief. The indian ne’er do well never adopts anyone.) He felt like he could make a better life there so they moved away from her nice life in Indiana to farm in Oklahoma. They went on to have six more children in Oklahoma. They were very poor. She worked alongside him in the fields.

She was a tiny woman. I remember seeing her once when she was sick in bed with shingles. She looked like a child lying there in her bed. She died on 16 February 1967 in Vinita, Oklahoma. She had been a widow for eight years.

 

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